Today is the official release date of Ben Miller’s River Bend Chronicle: The Junkification of a Boyhood Idyll amid the Curious Glory of Urban Iowa. This weekend, Steve Almond said that he read his copy of RBC while commuting to and from work. Three times in one week, he missed his stop because he was so engrossed in the book.

Today is the official release date of Ben Miller’s River Bend Chronicle: The Junkification of a Boyhood Idyll amid the Curious Glory of Urban Iowa. This weekend, Steve Almond said that he read his copy of RBC while commuting to and from work. Three times in one week, he missed his stop because he was so engrossed in the book.

Ben Miller’s book, River Bend Chronicle, just arrived to us on the delivery truck!

Ben Miller’s book, River Bend Chronicle, just arrived to us on the delivery truck!

Some days working at Lookout means reading amazing writing. Some days (like today) it means lots of spreadsheets.


P.S. Sorry to blur the contents, but we want to keep our next project a surprise! ;)

Some days working at Lookout means reading amazing writing. Some days (like today) it means lots of spreadsheets.

P.S. Sorry to blur the contents, but we want to keep our next project a surprise! ;)

Four Typographic Websites That Will Make Your Design Brain Happy
 
- Ana Alvarez, Lookout Intern

One of the cool things about the MFA program here is the emphasis of what you’re putting on the page. Not like similes or metaphors and whatnot, but whether you’re using a slab serif as your body text (big mistake, that). As the semester winds down and as the Bookbuilding students here begin their final project (designing and creating a chapbook of their own work), I thought I’d share some of my favorite websites about typography and design.
 

1) Typography Served
This website has everything from designer typefaces to fliers to brand creations. I usually find three new entries a day, so you’re always bound to spend lots of time mesmerized by the gorgeous and innovative designs here, whether they’re hand drawn or photoshopped. 

2) Lost Type Co-Op
Created by Tyler Galpin and Riley Cran, this cool website offers a plethora of fonts at a pay-what-you-can deal. And these aren’t “meh” fonts either. These are gorgeous fonts, vintage fonts, experimental fonts, and so on. It’s so easy to spend hours thinking of all the neat designs you can create with these beautiful typefaces. 

3) Photo Quote
Seriously, this guy makes me feel really unproductive. Alander Wong creates a new type treatment accompanied by a photo every day. Yep, every day. I have no idea how he does it. Anyway, these are his works so far, and it’s really cool to see how he’s conveyed different moods and different tricks and techniques. But also fun to see when he’s tossed everything to the side and tried something completely different! 

4) The Big Caption
In a similar fashion to Photo Quote, The Big Caption actually takes samples from The Boston Globe’s The Big Picture - a photojournalism section of Boston.com. The captions are often hilariously poignant and stylistically brilliant. It absolutely kills me that this site hasn’t been updated since last August. The designer, Ian Collins, maintains his Twitter account more often, and continues to promise a return to the blog. Please, Ian, please!
 

So these are some of my favorite typographic websites. What are some of yours?

The “Teaching Press” Model at UNCW- Katie Jones, Lookout Intern 
One of my favorite aspects of being a Lookout intern is getting to be a part of a teaching press. We work on our Lookout projects in the Publishing Laboratory, and on any given day the lab is full of Bookbuilding students designing layouts and putting together chapbooks, undergrads compiling the UNCW BFA anthology, and Pub Lab TAs tweaking the design of a Writers Week broadside or doing treatments for Ecotone's next issue.
I’m a TA and an intern, and this semester has given me such appreciation for the teaching press model. I love that the students working side-by-side in the lab have, in various capacities, been given the responsibility not only to read, write, and edit literature, but also to design, package, and market it so that it can be sent out into the world. When I decided to enroll in the MFA program here, I found the rigorous yet supportive writing community I’d hoped for, but I was surprised and delighted by the professional opportunities I’ve found here.
This semester, I’m helping to copy-edit River Bend Chronicle by Ben Miller and am planning a spring tour throughout North Carolina for Lookout author John Rybicki. I’ve learned a lot about the necessary steps for planning an author website, and about the ever-growing relationship between publishing and social media. I’ve discovered that North Carolina has a thriving network of independent bookstores, literary centers, radio stations, and other venues open to supporting the work Lookout does. This semester is already winding down, but our work at Lookout isn’t!

The “Teaching Press” Model at UNCW
- Katie Jones, Lookout Intern 


One of my favorite aspects of being a Lookout intern is getting to be a part of a teaching press. We work on our Lookout projects in the Publishing Laboratory, and on any given day the lab is full of Bookbuilding students designing layouts and putting together chapbooks, undergrads compiling the UNCW BFA anthology, and Pub Lab TAs tweaking the design of a Writers Week broadside or doing treatments for Ecotone's next issue.

I’m a TA and an intern, and this semester has given me such appreciation for the teaching press model. I love that the students working side-by-side in the lab have, in various capacities, been given the responsibility not only to read, write, and edit literature, but also to design, package, and market it so that it can be sent out into the world. When I decided to enroll in the MFA program here, I found the rigorous yet supportive writing community I’d hoped for, but I was surprised and delighted by the professional opportunities I’ve found here.

This semester, I’m helping to copy-edit River Bend Chronicle by Ben Miller and am planning a spring tour throughout North Carolina for Lookout author John Rybicki. I’ve learned a lot about the necessary steps for planning an author website, and about the ever-growing relationship between publishing and social media. I’ve discovered that North Carolina has a thriving network of independent bookstores, literary centers, radio stations, and other venues open to supporting the work Lookout does. This semester is already winding down, but our work at Lookout isn’t!

Box Book by Anna Sutton (Lookout Intern)

I used this tutorial to make a beautiful paper box for my Bookbuilding class here at UNCW (taught by Lookout’s own Emily Smith).

Make it cooler! Print a poem, short short, manifesto, or image on the inside of your paper before folding. Make sure you print a directive on the front corner of your page, like open me or unfold me. If you use a slightly bigger piece of paper, you can make a top for your box, too.

Bonus! If you make your own, send a photo our way and we’ll post it here on the blog!

(Source: lookout.org)

I tend to get work done while listening to music… possibly to the chagrin of the Lookout Books crew. Sorry, guys. Recently, I’ve been trying to combine the two by finding songs or artists with literary themes. Here’s a list of book-related music I’m listening to this week:

A few song titles to fit the mood…

  • Wrapped Up in Books by Belle & Sebastian 
     
  • Books Written for Girls by Camera Obscura 

A nicely named album or concerto titles that seem appropriate for reference…

  • Album: Libraries by The Love Language
     
  • Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 17 “The Tempest”

And, of course, band names!

  • Titus Andronicus
     
  • Ivan & Alyosha (And if you can’t get enough Dostoyevsky, check out their song called Fathers be Kind.)

What book-related music do you listen to?


- Ana Alvarez, Lookout Books Intern

(Source: Spotify)

Poet John Rybicki, breathing life into desolation

A powerful silence graced the room as Rybicki weaved through anecdotes of time spent with his wife and passages from his books. As he finished, most felt not a deafening sense of sorrow but rather a promised notion of his fortitude in overcoming a grave loss.
“He makes his poems out of true feeling — he lives his poetry,” said creative writing professor Robert Fanning, who introduced Rybicki to an audience of more than 100. “He’s doing things that are so far beyond what we can do in our best hour with our sharpest pen.”

This excellent article was published by CMU’s student-run publication, Grand Central Magazine. Read onward (more photos included).

Poet John Rybicki, breathing life into desolation

A powerful silence graced the room as Rybicki weaved through anecdotes of time spent with his wife and passages from his books. As he finished, most felt not a deafening sense of sorrow but rather a promised notion of his fortitude in overcoming a grave loss.

“He makes his poems out of true feeling — he lives his poetry,” said creative writing professor Robert Fanning, who introduced Rybicki to an audience of more than 100. “He’s doing things that are so far beyond what we can do in our best hour with our sharpest pen.”


This excellent article was published by CMU’s student-run publication, Grand Central Magazine. Read onward (more photos included).

"Here’s a little perspective: In 1939, gas cost 10 cents a gallon at the pump. A movie ticket set you back 20 cents. John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, the year’s bestselling hardcover book, was $2.75. For a nation suffering 20 percent unemployment, books were an impossible expense."

How Paperbacks Transformed the Way Americans Read - Mental Floss (via bookriot)

Wow! This excellent article puts a lot of things into perspective.

(via thebookas)

"Believe it or not, Generation Y might just be the most bibliophilic generation alive, according to a new consumer study. Gen Y – those born between 1979 and 1989 – spent the most money on books in 2011, knocking the longtime book-buying leaders, baby boomers, from the top spot, according to the 2012 U.S. Book Consumer Demographics and Buying Behaviors Annual Review."

Gen Y: the most book-loving generation alive? - CSMonitor.com (via infoneer-pulse)

(via thebookas)