Review of Edith Pearlman’s Binocular Vision in Financial Times:
"Sometimes, you look at a really intricate piece of work and you think something quite banal. You think: “How in the name of all that is holy did they get the ship into the bottle?” That is exactly what I found myself thinking as I read these stories – each of them meticulously made, miraculously precise, and so fully populated that you marvel one mind could invent so many distinct human beings from scratch."

Review of Edith Pearlman’s Binocular Vision in Financial Times:

"Sometimes, you look at a really intricate piece of work and you think something quite banal. You think: “How in the name of all that is holy did they get the ship into the bottle?” That is exactly what I found myself thinking as I read these stories – each of them meticulously made, miraculously precise, and so fully populated that you marvel one mind could invent so many distinct human beings from scratch."

Five Cover Letter Tips for Submitting to a Literary Journal:

1.      Like all writers, we love animals, but after a while we get a little tired of hearing about your pets. If you have three turtles, we don’t think, oh but those three turtles probably need some fancy flies that could be bought with the money from publishing this story. We’re happy you have things in your life that you love—but this is a cover letter. Let’s get to your story!

 

2.      It’s usually best to keep the letter brief. Sure, we want to know that you’ve been published by the Paris Review, the New Yorker, and Agni—Hooray!—but then you’re fine with the phrase “and many other journals.” Listing another twenty places feels unnecessary. Plus the block of text makes our eyes glaze. Pick the top three or four—maybe five—and keep some mystery in this relationship.

 

3.      That being said, give us a little more than a two-word cover letter reading “story attached.” If you could write a salutation, the genre of your piece and a brief “thanks for reading,” we really would appreciate it. We want to be drawn in to your work and, let’s be honest, everyone likes a little charm. 

 

4.      Avoid all caps if possible. It’s unfortunate for all of us that Submittable won’t let you use italics. BUT PLEASE DON’T SHOUT THE TITLE OF YOUR STORY.

 

5. Many journals, including ours, are partially staffed by students, so we know it’s confusing that our genre editors turn over every two or so years. But as fiction editor, I’d rather you address me as “editor” than someone who hasn’t been involved in the magazine in eight years. It makes us think you haven’t read (or, come on, Googled) the magazine in eight years either. We want to invest time in you; invest a little time in us.  Let us know you read and know us as a magazine.

 

image

Ecotone’s overwhelmed fiction editor. Ahh!


— Nicola DeRobertis-Theye, Lookout Intern, Fiction Editor of Ecotone

beauxland:

“Cornelia had had her eye on it for years. It reminded her of the cottage of a gnome. “Guhnome,” Aunt Shelley used to miscorrect. The other houses in the loose settlement by the pond were darkly weathered wood, but Cornelia’s was made of the local pale gray granite, sparkling here and there with…


- Edith Pearlman, “Self-Reliance,” Binocular Vision, 2011

Edith Pearlman accepting the 2012 Harold U. Ribalow Prize, given by Hadassah magazine in a ceremony yesterday afternoon at Hadassah House in Manhattan.The award honors an outstanding book of Jewish fiction, and previous winners include Nathan Englander, Francine Prose, Louise Begley, and Jonathan Safran Foer.
Congrats Edith!

Edith Pearlman accepting the 2012 Harold U. Ribalow Prize, given by Hadassah magazine in a ceremony yesterday afternoon at Hadassah House in Manhattan.

The award honors an outstanding book of Jewish fiction, and previous winners include Nathan Englander, Francine Prose, Louise Begley, and Jonathan Safran Foer.

Congrats Edith!

The place by the water -

beauxland:

“Cornelia had had her eye on it for years. It reminded her of the cottage of a gnome. “Guhnome,” Aunt Shelley used to miscorrect. The other houses in the loose settlement by the pond were darkly weathered wood, but Cornelia’s was made of the local pale gray granite, sparkling here and there with tiny golden specks. It had green shutters. There was one room downstairs and one up, an outdoor toilet, a small generator. Aquatic vines climbed the stones. Frogs and newts inhabited the moist garden.

She spent more and more time there. At the bottom of the pond, turtles inched their way to wherever they were going. Minnows traveled together, the whole congregation turning this way and then that, an underwater flag flapping in an underwater wind. Birches, lightly clothed in leaves, leaned toward the pond.

“I worry about you in the middle of nowhere,” her daughter, Julie, said. But the glinting stones of the house, its whitewashed interior, summer’s greenness and winter’s pale blueness seen through its deep windows, the mysterious endless brown of the peaked space above her bed … and pond and trees and loons and chipmunks … not nowhere. Somewhere. Herewhere.”

- Edith Pearlman, “Self-Reliance,” Binocular Vision, 2011

Another step on our quest to find all the Steve Almonds that aren’t Steve Almond.

Another step on our quest to find all the Steve Almonds that aren’t Steve Almond.

My Top 5 Post-Modern Detective Novels

by Lookout Intern, Joe Worthen

#5 - Noir by Robert Coover

Noir is essentially a compendium of detective tropes written in 2nd person, strung together to give the impression of narrative. You, Philip M Noir, spend most of the book drunk, searching for a widow in a maze of murder, jazz and cigarette smoke. As goons continually beat you in the head, victims change into suspects, corpses turn up living, and dead end clues pile up with the bullet casings.


#4 - Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem

Motherless Brooklyn follows Lionel Essog, a low-level wiseguy with Tourettes as he attempts to investigate of the death of his mentor, Frank Minna. Lionel’s unique voice could easily go overboard but instead Lethem uses the platform of Tourettes to generate engaging language peppered with great images, non-sequiturs and profanity.


#3 - Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon

Postmodern granddaddy Thomas Pynchon returns to the detective narrative in Inherent Vice. The New York grid is replaced with palm-lined streets of Southern California and the hard-boiled detective is replaced with an observant stoner named Doc Sportello. With the 60s at an end and the zeitgeist in flux, Doc helps his ex-girlfriend Shasta get to the bottom of a sun washed LA murder plot. (Also check out The Crying of Lot 49)


#2 - The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle begins with Toru Okada trying to solve the everyday case of a missing cat but that quickly complicates. In just a few chapters, Toru winds up divorced and submerged in a mystery he barely understands. In Murakami’s Japan an important clue is just as likely to be found in a dream as in the real world and the effect is a pervasive unrealness. But somehow, through this haze of stacked realities, Murakami manages to maintain a vivid emotionality in his characters that most pomo mysteries don’t even approach. 


#1 - The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster

Though he wasn’t the first author to play with the detective genre in a literary way, Paul Auster wrote the quintessential pomo mystery when he wrote The New York Trilogy. He wrote it three times. Auster plays with bare tropes like Noir but doesn’t come across as cynical or hurried. The New York Trilogy slowly introduces its crossbred writer/detectives to their lonely mysteries in a New York that often feels empty. As the detectives investigate, the writers deconstruct the mystery genre in beautiful, stark meditations.

Other interesting variations:

Pattern Recognition
by William Gibson
The Names by Don Delillo
Big Machine by Victor Lavalle
Panopticon by David Bajo

We spy Binocular Vision by Edith Pearlman in the top row of “Must-Read Books 2012” from the Massachusetts Center for the Book!

- John Mortara, Lookout Intern

We spy Binocular Vision by Edith Pearlman in the top row of “Must-Read Books 2012” from the Massachusetts Center for the Book!


- John Mortara, Lookout Intern

Here’s an article recently published about the recent Lookout Books reading at UNCW in The Seahawk.

"The Story" by Edith Pearlman has been posted to The Hinge’s site!
You can read it, ask questions, and make comments.
To top it all off, Edith will be joining the chat on April 17 from 3-4!

"The Story" by Edith Pearlman has been posted to The Hinge’s site!

You can read it, ask questions, and make comments.

To top it all off, Edith will be joining the chat on April 17 from 3-4!