Ben Miller rocked his reading at KGB Bar last night—his first from River Bend Chronicle!

Ben Miller rocked his reading at KGB Bar last night—his first from River Bend Chronicle!

carissahalston:

This Is an Experiment - Episode 46: Page 153 of Edith Pearlman’s Binocular Vision

Edith Pearlman isn’t just an award-winning author—she’s also local. I love Boston writers, so it made me really happy to include this page in TIAE.

A great reading of Edith Pearlman’s “The Coat.”

adrinkandabook:

A drink and two books. Edith Pearlman’s Binocular Vision and Euripides’ Four Plays

Perfect in so many ways

adrinkandabook:

A drink and two books. Edith Pearlman’s Binocular Vision and Euripides’ Four Plays

Perfect in so many ways

Lookout Books poet John Rybicki will be doing a reading and workshop at Haverford College next week.

Lookout Books poet John Rybicki will be doing a reading and workshop at Haverford College next week.

A Few Recommended Recommendations
Walking into a library or bookstore—or falling into the swirling vortex the kids call the “World Wide Web”—can be an overwhelming experience. Life is short, and there’s so much literature worth consuming. We all long for a weekend afternoon on the couch, our only companions a cup of coffee and a good book. But what book? You’ve got five sitting unread on your shelf, not to mention three stacked by the front door (library due date approaching), and a Readability queue full of the online essays and short stories you marked “read later.” If you own an eReader, you probably went crazy downloading all the public domain classics you never got around to in high school. Where to begin?
Allow me to simplify things for you by offering some recommendations from a few trusted sources. Herein you’ll discover brand new literature, the craziest stuff on Wikipedia, and everything in between. Mark down what’s of interest to you and disregard the rest. You’ll never run out of things to read, so you may as well just pick something and get started, no regrets. 
1)  Roxane Gay’s Reading Roundup, Fall 2012: The Rumpus offers some great recommendations and reviews from the co-editor of PANK. She organizes her selections into categories such as “Coming of Age” and “Looking Ahead.” 
2)  Treehouse: This new online literary magazine requires its contributors to submit Top Five recommendations lists which appear on the site the day after their own creative work is published. The links range in theme from Wikipedia articles to poetry collections to banned books. (The actual pieces posted in Treehouse are excellent, too.)
3)  One Way to Talk About Contemporary Fiction: my friend Chris maintains this Tumblr with a friend of his. Find regular links to new fiction and lit-related happenings, nearly all of which are available online. 
4)  Radiolab: This isn’t a recommendation list per se, but the website for Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich’s fantastic science radio show is chock full of great listening and reading material. Subscribe to the podcast, check out the show archives, and find supplementary reading material for many episodes. 
When you’re on the hunt for new reading material, where do you look first? Whose opinion do you trust the most? Let us know in the comments! 
 
 

A Few Recommended Recommendations

Walking into a library or bookstore—or falling into the swirling vortex the kids call the “World Wide Web”—can be an overwhelming experience. Life is short, and there’s so much literature worth consuming. We all long for a weekend afternoon on the couch, our only companions a cup of coffee and a good book. But what book? You’ve got five sitting unread on your shelf, not to mention three stacked by the front door (library due date approaching), and a Readability queue full of the online essays and short stories you marked “read later.” If you own an eReader, you probably went crazy downloading all the public domain classics you never got around to in high school. Where to begin?

Allow me to simplify things for you by offering some recommendations from a few trusted sources. Herein you’ll discover brand new literature, the craziest stuff on Wikipedia, and everything in between. Mark down what’s of interest to you and disregard the rest. You’ll never run out of things to read, so you may as well just pick something and get started, no regrets.

1)  Roxane Gay’s Reading Roundup, Fall 2012: The Rumpus offers some great recommendations and reviews from the co-editor of PANK. She organizes her selections into categories such as “Coming of Age” and “Looking Ahead.”

2)  Treehouse: This new online literary magazine requires its contributors to submit Top Five recommendations lists which appear on the site the day after their own creative work is published. The links range in theme from Wikipedia articles to poetry collections to banned books. (The actual pieces posted in Treehouse are excellent, too.)

3)  One Way to Talk About Contemporary Fiction: my friend Chris maintains this Tumblr with a friend of his. Find regular links to new fiction and lit-related happenings, nearly all of which are available online.

4)  Radiolab: This isn’t a recommendation list per se, but the website for Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich’s fantastic science radio show is chock full of great listening and reading material. Subscribe to the podcast, check out the show archives, and find supplementary reading material for many episodes.

When you’re on the hunt for new reading material, where do you look first? Whose opinion do you trust the most? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

My Top 5 Post-Modern Detective Novels

by Lookout Intern, Joe Worthen

#5 - Noir by Robert Coover

Noir is essentially a compendium of detective tropes written in 2nd person, strung together to give the impression of narrative. You, Philip M Noir, spend most of the book drunk, searching for a widow in a maze of murder, jazz and cigarette smoke. As goons continually beat you in the head, victims change into suspects, corpses turn up living, and dead end clues pile up with the bullet casings.


#4 - Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem

Motherless Brooklyn follows Lionel Essog, a low-level wiseguy with Tourettes as he attempts to investigate of the death of his mentor, Frank Minna. Lionel’s unique voice could easily go overboard but instead Lethem uses the platform of Tourettes to generate engaging language peppered with great images, non-sequiturs and profanity.


#3 - Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon

Postmodern granddaddy Thomas Pynchon returns to the detective narrative in Inherent Vice. The New York grid is replaced with palm-lined streets of Southern California and the hard-boiled detective is replaced with an observant stoner named Doc Sportello. With the 60s at an end and the zeitgeist in flux, Doc helps his ex-girlfriend Shasta get to the bottom of a sun washed LA murder plot. (Also check out The Crying of Lot 49)


#2 - The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle begins with Toru Okada trying to solve the everyday case of a missing cat but that quickly complicates. In just a few chapters, Toru winds up divorced and submerged in a mystery he barely understands. In Murakami’s Japan an important clue is just as likely to be found in a dream as in the real world and the effect is a pervasive unrealness. But somehow, through this haze of stacked realities, Murakami manages to maintain a vivid emotionality in his characters that most pomo mysteries don’t even approach. 


#1 - The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster

Though he wasn’t the first author to play with the detective genre in a literary way, Paul Auster wrote the quintessential pomo mystery when he wrote The New York Trilogy. He wrote it three times. Auster plays with bare tropes like Noir but doesn’t come across as cynical or hurried. The New York Trilogy slowly introduces its crossbred writer/detectives to their lonely mysteries in a New York that often feels empty. As the detectives investigate, the writers deconstruct the mystery genre in beautiful, stark meditations.

Other interesting variations:

Pattern Recognition
by William Gibson
The Names by Don Delillo
Big Machine by Victor Lavalle
Panopticon by David Bajo

Poet John Rybicki, breathing life into desolation

A powerful silence graced the room as Rybicki weaved through anecdotes of time spent with his wife and passages from his books. As he finished, most felt not a deafening sense of sorrow but rather a promised notion of his fortitude in overcoming a grave loss.
“He makes his poems out of true feeling — he lives his poetry,” said creative writing professor Robert Fanning, who introduced Rybicki to an audience of more than 100. “He’s doing things that are so far beyond what we can do in our best hour with our sharpest pen.”

This excellent article was published by CMU’s student-run publication, Grand Central Magazine. Read onward (more photos included).

Poet John Rybicki, breathing life into desolation

A powerful silence graced the room as Rybicki weaved through anecdotes of time spent with his wife and passages from his books. As he finished, most felt not a deafening sense of sorrow but rather a promised notion of his fortitude in overcoming a grave loss.

“He makes his poems out of true feeling — he lives his poetry,” said creative writing professor Robert Fanning, who introduced Rybicki to an audience of more than 100. “He’s doing things that are so far beyond what we can do in our best hour with our sharpest pen.”


This excellent article was published by CMU’s student-run publication, Grand Central Magazine. Read onward (more photos included).

You may have noticed that Lookout is celebrating Banned Books Week, which runs from September 30 – October 6.Here in Wilmington, Old Books On Front St. hosted a Banned Books Read-In on October 1st. The YouTube channel Banned Books Week Virtual Read-Out features readers “exercising their First Amendment Right to read a banned book.” Hopefully many readers across the U.S. have been spending this week feeling grateful for—and inspired by—the opportunity to read banned books and fight back against the egregious acts of censorship that have prevented many readers from accessing these titles.
The American Library Association (ALA) explains that at least 326 books were removed from or challenged by U.S. schools and libraries in 2011. Sadly, they also estimate that 70 – 80 percent of acts of censorship go unreported. From Call to the Wild to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to To Kill a Mockingbird, some of our nation’s beloved classics have done time on institutional ban lists. Literary censorship doesn’t stop with literature from the 19th and 20th centuries, however: contemporary books such as The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie were among the most challenged titles of 2011. (The ALA explains that “challenged” means an attempt by an individual or group to remove or limit access to a piece of literature. A “banning” occurs when that piece of literature is actually restricted by a particular institution.)
 If you’re wondering how you can participate in the fight for fair access to literature during Banned Books Week and beyond, here are some ideas:
1) Check out the 50 State Salute to discover events and ideas from every state
2) Participate in the Virtual Read-Out by submitting a video, promoting the cause through social media, and commenting on your favorite contributions.
3) Read widely and often! Banned, challenged, or not, being a proud visible reader makes an awesome statement.
4) Purchase—or check out from the library—books you know to have been challenged or banned. For ideas, download the National Council of Teachers of English list of challenged books.
5) Support your local schools and libraries by informing the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom if you hear about a challenge to a book in your community.
Remember, Banned Books Week only happens once a year as a way to raise awareness about book-banning and challenging, but it’s a relevant national and international issue every day of every year. Let your celebration of challenged, challenging, thought-provoking literature extend far beyond October 6! 
 - Katie Jones, Lookout Books Intern

You may have noticed that Lookout is celebrating Banned Books Week, which runs from September 30 – October 6.

Here in Wilmington, Old Books On Front St. hosted a Banned Books Read-In on October 1st. The YouTube channel Banned Books Week Virtual Read-Out features readers “exercising their First Amendment Right to read a banned book.”

Hopefully many readers across the U.S. have been spending this week feeling grateful for—and inspired by—the opportunity to read banned books and fight back against the egregious acts of censorship that have prevented many readers from accessing these titles.

The American Library Association (ALA) explains that at least 326 books were removed from or challenged by U.S. schools and libraries in 2011. Sadly, they also estimate that 70 – 80 percent of acts of censorship go unreported. From Call to the Wild to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to To Kill a Mockingbird, some of our nation’s beloved classics have done time on institutional ban lists. Literary censorship doesn’t stop with literature from the 19th and 20th centuries, however: contemporary books such as The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie were among the most challenged titles of 2011. (The ALA explains that “challenged” means an attempt by an individual or group to remove or limit access to a piece of literature. A “banning” occurs when that piece of literature is actually restricted by a particular institution.)

 If you’re wondering how you can participate in the fight for fair access to literature during Banned Books Week and beyond, here are some ideas:

1) Check out the 50 State Salute to discover events and ideas from every state

2) Participate in the Virtual Read-Out by submitting a video, promoting the cause through social media, and commenting on your favorite contributions.

3) Read widely and often! Banned, challenged, or not, being a proud visible reader makes an awesome statement.

4) Purchase—or check out from the library—books you know to have been challenged or banned. For ideas, download the National Council of Teachers of English list of challenged books.

5) Support your local schools and libraries by informing the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom if you hear about a challenge to a book in your community.

Remember, Banned Books Week only happens once a year as a way to raise awareness about book-banning and challenging, but it’s a relevant national and international issue every day of every year. Let your celebration of challenged, challenging, thought-provoking literature extend far beyond October 6!

 - Katie Jones, Lookout Books Intern

A great Banned Books Week message from Author Judy Blume!

flavorpill:

Graphic Artworks Inspired by 20th Century American Authors

flavorpill:

Graphic Artworks Inspired by 20th Century American Authors